Posts Tagged ‘hayasatan’

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[Web Wrap]: AVC Volunteers Foster Service, Leadership, and Community in Armenia.

September 22, 2010

Via The Armenian Weekly

YEREVAN—Former U.S. President Ronald Reagan once said, “No matter how big and powerful government gets, and the many services it provides, it can never take the place of volunteers.” President Barack Obama recently concurred: “The need for action always exceeds the limits of government.” The Armenian Volunteer Corps (AVC) wholeheartedly agrees and apparently so do the volunteers who come to Armenia from all over the world.

Forty-three volunteers, from 21-55 years of age, came to Armenia this summer from Canada, Argentina, Brazil, Greece, United Kingdom, France, Jordan, and the United States. They served in governmental, private and non-profit sectors including, but not limited to, the Gyumri IT Center, Historic Armenian Houses, Foundation for the Preservation of Wildlife and Cultural Assets, Gyumri Healthy Center, Caritas Armenia, Civilitas Foundation, Manana Youth Center, TUMO Center for Creative Technologies, Erebuni Hospital, ReAnimania Yerevan International Animation Film Festival, National Competitiveness Foundation, Journalists Club Asparez, Shirak Regional Museum of Archeology, Center for Health Services Research, American University of Armenia, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Nagorno-Karabagh Republic, and the list goes on.

Please continue reading here.

The Gyumri Information Technology Center (GTech)

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Credit: FAR Staff

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[Web Wrap]: Those Strange Sounding Armenian Family Names.

August 4, 2010

Have you ever thought about the meaning of “ian”? Most Armenian names end in “ian” or “yan,” meaning the “son of ,” but some Diaspora Armenians have changed these endings to blend in their host societies. Today in Turkey “oglu” often replaces “ian,” while Russian Armenians may change the endings to “ov”; e.g., Gary Kasparov, Serge Parajanov. A name ending in “ian” is not always exclusively Armenian, since the ending can also be occasionally found in names in Irish, Persian, English, Philippine and some other cultures.

Please continue exploring here.

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[FAR Fine Art Painter’s Program]: A Chance to Commune with Nature.

August 4, 2010

Several Armenian artists recently returned from a trip to Lake Sevan where they were able to focus on their work thanks to the FAR Fine Art Painter’s Program. For 10 years, FAR has worked with the Artists Union of Armenia to organize these excursions. The program covers transportation costs and provides food and supplies for the day trips, which are a welcome respite from Yerevan and a chance for these artists to immerse themselves in and be inspired by nature.

The program is incredibly important, as it helps to educate Armenian artists on the richness and treasures of their country, and gain a new perspective through which they can express themselves, according to FAR’s Press Secretary Levon Lachikyan.

FAR usually holds the trip three times a year and each artist thanked FAR with the gift of a painting.

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Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Web Wrap]: Armenian Scientists Holders of South Caucasus Cup.

July 27, 2010

Via Panorama.am

Armenian team became the “Brain ring” Caucasus Cup holder held in Batumi from July 23-25, Tigran Kocharyan, the President of Armenian Association of Scientists told.

57 teams attended South Caucasus 12th competitions – 9 Armenian, 17 Azerbaijani and 31 georgian. Kocharyan said the team is getting prepared to World Cup which is scheduled in Israel in November.

Batumi competitions included “What? Where? When?”, “Brain ring”, “Jeopardy”, and “Erudite” intellectual games.

Jury included famous Russian scientists Alexander Druz, Boris Burda, Ilya Novikov.

Please continue reading here.

Hat Tip: Ani Wandaryan via @GoldenTent on Twitter

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[FAR Scholarships]: Nishanian Scholars Graduate Gavar State University.

July 27, 2010

For nearly nine years, the Jerair Nishanian Foundation has implemented the Jerair Nishanian Scholarship Program in Armenia through FAR. This program has given more than 50 socially vulnerable students from Gavar State University in the Gegharkunik region and Yerevan State University of Architecture and Construction the opportunity to continue on to higher education.

This year, 12 of the program’s 53 beneficiaries graduated from Gavar State University. One graduate student and seven undergraduate students earned degrees with honors, also known as “Red Diplomas.” Gavar State University Rector Ruzanna Hakobyan, Der Markos Bishop Hovhannisyan, Gegharkunik Diocese Primate, and other guests attended the ceremony. Ruzanna Hakobyan and Der Markos opened the ceremony with their welcome speeches.

While bittersweet, the atmosphere was also exciting and joyful. The 79 graduate students and 253 undergraduates had to say farewell to their beloved university, yet they were also proud. They are now able to fully contribute to the development of their country with their newly achieved knowledge and skills.

In their speeches, the students thanked first and foremost supporter and friend of GSU Jerair Nishanian, who gave them the opportunity to fulfill their dream and study at the university. Graduates also promised to help students in similar conditions at their first opportunity to do so.

Twelve beneficiaries received their diploma

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Credit: FAR Staff

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[Hayastani Kidak Society]: The Stepanavan District in Armenia Introduces New Travel Guide.

July 23, 2010

The Stepanavan District in Armenia introduces its new Travel Guide to develop tourism in this area. The project has been made possible through a International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX) grant. The purpose of creating this travel guide is to attract more tourists and visitors and new investors to this district, bring government attention to a former tourism center of Armenia and help to improve the economy of the region.

You can download it here.

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Credit: Stepanavan District

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[ACYOA Dispatches]: Lake Sevan.

July 22, 2010

By Arman Ayrapetyan

Nothing on this three-week trip has topped the excitement of climbing the mountains around Lake Sevan. Together our group scaled the steep mountainside along with Tigran, our tour guide. It felt as though we would never make it to the top, and I had some thoughts of calling it quits, but I forced myself to finish the climb. As we got higher, it started getting colder, our ears started to pop, and for me, it became increasingly harder to breathe.

At the top of the tallest mountain we climbed, sat what we thought was a lightning rod, surrounded by a wide field. Lake Sevan was a great view from the top, and our hotel was as small as a fingernail.

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Credit: Arman Ayrapetyan

To our surprise we heard thunder, and not too long after, it started to drizzle. After taking our pictures, we started working our way back down. The mountain became increasingly slippery and I found myself falling on sharp plants. Due to the poor traction of my sneakers, I was the last one to make it to the bottom. We then bypassed an angry dog and finished the climb with a victory picture.

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Credit: Arman Ayrapetyan