Posts Tagged ‘genocide’

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[Web Wrap]: Find a Middle Ground: Armenian Church and Getty Should Work Together.

July 20, 2010

By Heghnar Watenpaugh via Los Angeles Times

Hat Tip: Liana Aghajanian via @writepudding on Twitter

Seven illustrated pages ripped out of a medieval Gospels manuscript: Who owns them; who should own them? Those who value them as works of art, or those who revere them as religious objects? The seven pages feature beautiful illuminations by Toros Roslin, the most important Armenian miniatures painter of the Middle Ages. Their value is immense as artifacts, but also as rare witnesses to the memory of a nation almost erased from history. The manuscript from which the pages were torn was lost during the Armenian genocide of 1915-22 The Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church of America believes those seven pages are holy and belong to the church: It is suing the J. Paul Getty Museum to get them back. The Getty says it owns the pages as works of art and acquired them legally.

Please continue reading here.

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[FAR Schools]: New Computers Will Benefit Gavar #1 Special School.

July 7, 2010

Margaret Ajemian Ahnert, author of The Knock at the Door who traveled to Armenia in April, recently donated brand new computers to the Gavar #1 Special School.

Ms. Ahnert visited the school as well as some other FAR projects after presenting the Armenian translation of her book at the Genocide museum in Yerevan. She was compelled to give after meeting with the 80 disabled children who attend the school, talking with them, and learning about their interests and hobbies.

Until now, the school has only had two worn out machines to work from. All of us at FAR would like to express our gratitude for this generous donation. These new computers are sure to be utilized and enjoyed by students for years to come.

New Computers at the Gavar Special School

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Credit: FAR Staff

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[Photography]: Nazik Armenakyan Presents: Images of Genocide survivors.

April 29, 2010

Hat Tip: Shushan Harutyunyan

A photo exhibition honoring survivors of the Armenian Genocide titled simply “Survivors” opened April 23 at the Union of Artists in Yerevan and is the two-year work of photojournalist Nazik Armenakyan.

In black and white it presents photos of 40 people who were eyewitnesses to the horrors that befell Armenians during the scourge by Ottoman Turkey in 1915-18.

Armenakyan, staff photographer at ArmeniaNow, says the experience of capturing the faces that represent the family histories of so many millions of Armenians worldwide was “another attempt to remind of the innocent victims of 1915.”

Continue on ArmeniaNow.

Don’t miss the online version of the “Survivors” photo project.

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Copyright: Nazik Armenakyan

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[FAR New York]: One more Knock at the Door for Amasia.

April 28, 2010

Twenty-five kilometers northwest of Gyumri, just over the Akhurian River on the Turkish-Armenian border, lies Amasia. Departing from Gyumri, we drove for about 30 minutes along a half paved, half unpaved road, gazing at the imposing snow-covered mountains and shielding our eyes from the glinting sun. With us we bore a gift for Amasia’s library – a copy of Margaret Ajemian Ahnet’s book The Knock at the Door: A Journey Through the Darkness of the Armenian Genocide.

Continue reading.

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Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Web Wrap]: Memorial Service in Yerevan Honors Armenian Genocide Victims.

April 27, 2010

By Ashley Killough via ianyan Magazine

Ashley Killough is an American journalist and Fulbright fellow in Yerevan. She blogs about her experiences in Armenia at www.ashleykillough.com

I first learned about the Armenian Genocide nearly three years ago from an Armenian professor at my university. I mostly felt disturbed—not only by the tragedy, but by the fact that I was 20-years-old at the time and was just now learning about it. How could such an event be omitted from my primary education? How could we study the Holocaust so much, yet neglect the Armenian Genocide?

Please continue reading and watching her video here.

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Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[FAR New York]: Remembering the Armenian Genocide.

April 24, 2010

Today the world is reminded of unspeakable tragedy. Ninety-five years have passed since Ottoman Turkey tried to eradicate the Armenian heritage, identity, and culture from the world. This effort managed to extinguish 1.5 million lives and displace millions more in the generations that followed.

We at the Fund for Armenian Relief join our voice to millions of those all around the Globe to say: this period of darkness must never be forgotten.

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[FAR New York]: We will never forget.

April 23, 2010

On April 24, like every year, FAR Armenia staff will visit Tsitsernakaberd Memorial and place flowers on the genocide monument. FAR Mathevosian Scholars and other program beneficiary are going to join and pay tribute to the victims of the Armenian Genocide.

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Credit: Levon Lachikyan