Posts Tagged ‘armenia’

h1

[Armenian Archeology]: Karahunj.

September 20, 2010

By Levon Lachikyan

With a history stretching back farther than the pyramids, the stones of Karahunj near the town of Sisian in Southern Armenia, is considered by both Armenian and foreign archeologists alike to be one of the ancient astronomy centers of the world. For years, parallels have been drawn between Karahunj and England’s Stonehenge.

Recently, Vachagan Vahradyan, biologist, adviser and chief scientist of the 2010 Armenian-British “Stones and Stars” expedition, summarized his latest research, reporting that Karahunj is older than its previously thought 3,800 years, and that it is in fact 7,000 years old.

During a recent press conference he quoted Heinrich Schliemann, an excavator of ruins of the famed city of Troy by saying, “For Europe, the tragedy was to choose as the basis of its civilization the ancient Greek culture and not the ancient culture of Armenia.”

One of the brilliant examples of Armenia’s leadership as an ancient civilization is its ancient religious complex Portasar, located in Turkey. By drawing parallels between photos, stone shapes and galaxies, Vahradyan believes that the stones of these monuments appear to be a continuation of each other.

Months ago, Vahradyan presented these studies to Oxford University professors. They were received with great enthusiasm and interest. This September, a delegation of scientists from Oxford visits Armenia for a two-week expedition.

h1

[Web Wrap]: BBC – Armenia, The Cleverest Nation on Earth.

September 20, 2010

Via BBC World Service

Armenia – a tiny, poor country of around three million people – has won the chess Olympics twice in a row. In so doing, it has triumphed over giants like Russia, China and the US.

Chess is pursued fanatically in many parts of the world, but nowhere more so than Armenia, where its over-the-board stars have become national celebrities.

But how has little Armenia created a nation of chess geniuses – is there something in the water? Assignment investigates.

Please listen to the BBC broadcast here.

2366892707_c78f93d4fb.jpg

Credit: Frank Black Noir
via Creative Commons / Flickr

h1

[Web Wrap]: Those Strange Sounding Armenian Family Names.

August 4, 2010

Have you ever thought about the meaning of “ian”? Most Armenian names end in “ian” or “yan,” meaning the “son of ,” but some Diaspora Armenians have changed these endings to blend in their host societies. Today in Turkey “oglu” often replaces “ian,” while Russian Armenians may change the endings to “ov”; e.g., Gary Kasparov, Serge Parajanov. A name ending in “ian” is not always exclusively Armenian, since the ending can also be occasionally found in names in Irish, Persian, English, Philippine and some other cultures.

Please continue exploring here.

h1

[FAR Fine Art Painter’s Program]: A Chance to Commune with Nature.

August 4, 2010

Several Armenian artists recently returned from a trip to Lake Sevan where they were able to focus on their work thanks to the FAR Fine Art Painter’s Program. For 10 years, FAR has worked with the Artists Union of Armenia to organize these excursions. The program covers transportation costs and provides food and supplies for the day trips, which are a welcome respite from Yerevan and a chance for these artists to immerse themselves in and be inspired by nature.

The program is incredibly important, as it helps to educate Armenian artists on the richness and treasures of their country, and gain a new perspective through which they can express themselves, according to FAR’s Press Secretary Levon Lachikyan.

FAR usually holds the trip three times a year and each artist thanked FAR with the gift of a painting.

Artists Spring tour.jpg

Artists Summer trip.jpg

DSC05461.JPG

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

h1

[Dispatches from Armenia]: Sunday at the Shuka.

August 2, 2010

Sunday morning and my kitchen is bare. I head to the shuka around the corner from my house to pick up some fruit and vegetables and whatever else strikes my interest. Before I know it, I’m mesmerized by row upon row of eggplants, cucumbers, tomatoes, apricots, oranges, sunflowers, and buckets of saffron that look like gold. I could go on forever. I haven’t eaten yet and I want to devour it all. There are baskets of pears, peaches, and plums on one shelf, smooth and so perfectly poised with even their stems and one green leaf intact. They don’t look real.

Shuka 1

Credit: FAR Staff

I’d never had a fresh apricot before coming to Armenia. Now I don’t want to try one anywhere else because I know they’ll never be as good. I buy some of these, along with peaches, apples, cucumbers, tomatoes, a cluster of basil. Then there’s the dried fruit. I don’t even have a chance to say (or signal) that I’ve spent all my money before vendors cut me sample after sample of cherry-wrapped almonds, and figs, apricots and peaches that are sweetened with honey and stuffed with walnuts, hazelnuts, cashews and cinnamon. Before I know it I’m full, my arms ache from my bags, my fingers are sticky and I’m making promises to come back after I go to the bank. If there’s a better way to fill one’s stomach and cupboard, I have yet to think of it. 

Erin –

Shuka 2

Credit: FAR Staff

h1

[Armenian Life]: Armenian-American Artist to Perform at The Club Tomorrow Night.

August 2, 2010

Armenian-American artist Melissa Boyajian will be showing several of her photo and video pieces at The Club (40 Tumanyan Street) in downtown Yerevan at 6 pm tomorrow night. A native of Boston, MA, Ms. Boyajian’s work will encompass issues of post-colonial identity, Armenian Diaspora identity, and cultural assimilation, among other things. FAR’s Hasmik Manukyan will be translating the presentation. Click here for more information.

Delicious fruit
Credit: Melissa Boyajian

h1

[GTech]: More Qualified IT Experts for Armenia.

August 2, 2010

After two years of hard work and dedication, 14 Gyumri Information Technology Center students received their diplomas during a graduation ceremony at Gyumri’s Cinema October Hall this month. Instructors, alumni, family and friends from Gyumri and Yerevan filled the room. The day was a fitting close to their program, but also a wonderful commencement of a new chapter in the lives of these now highly qualified IT experts who have a better chance of exceling in their field. GTech staff members and everyone at FAR wish these graduates the very best.

gtech-pic-1_small.jpg

Credit: FAR Staff

As the only educational institution in the area, which provides training in information technology, GTech has brought new opportunity and growth to Armenia and it has given Armenians the skills they need to take part in this growing industry since 2005.

gtech-pic-2_small.jpg

Credit: FAR Staff