Archive for the ‘Web Wrap’ Category

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[Web Wrap]: World’s Oldest Winery Found in Armenian Cave.

January 12, 2011

Let’s add this to the list!

Via Asbarez.com

WASHINGTON — The earliest known winery, approximately 6,000 years old according to researchers, has been uncovered in a cave in the mountains of Armenia.

A vat to press the grapes, fermentation jars and even a cup and drinking bowl dating to about 6,000 years ago were discovered in the cave complex by an international team of researchers.

While older evidence of wine drinking has been found, this is the earliest example of complete wine production, according to Gregory Areshian of the University of California, Los Angeles, co-director of the excavation.

The findings, announced Tuesday by the National Geographic Society, are published in the online edition of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Please continue reading here.

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[Web Wrap]: The Half-Armenian Identity: But Your Name Is…

January 11, 2011

What defines the Armenian identity?

By Robert Fullam via ianyan MAG

I have encountered the phrase “but your name is,” countless times when I meet new Armenians and non-Armenians alike. Explaining to non-Armenians that my mom is the Armenian has never been too hard but it is the conversations with Armenians that always tend to get me. Most if not all half-Armenians with an Armenian mother have encountered this. You go to a church picnic or recognize an Armenian name in school, etc and introduce yourself. Everything is going fine and then you tell them your name. They get this look on their face, of slight confusion, like they’re trying to reconcile your claim to your identity with your obviously non-Armenian surname. Repeated experiences of this situation had slowly made me feel slightly ashamed when I told Armenians my name, every time I told somebody, it felt as if all the eyes in the room were looking at me, judging me, judging if I were authentically Armenian.

Please continue reading here.

St. Hripsime Church in Echmiadzin
completed in 618, is one of the
Oldest surviving churches in Armenia.

St. Hripsime

Credit: Rita Willaert/Creative Commons/via ianyan Mag

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[Web Wrap]: Living in Armenia: The Battle of Poverty and Prosperity.

January 11, 2011

This is a great testament to the existing economic disparity in Armenia. Read!

By Maria Titizian via Asbarez.com

I have had to bear witness to poverty in my homeland more times than I care to remember. I have felt the bitter cold of winter on my back each time I have gone to the village of Vedi for Christmas to visit distant relatives who live there. The same occurred again this year when I made my annual trek to see this family of six who live in conditions that should bring shame on all of us.

Please continue reading here.

Etchmiadzin, Armenia, 2009

Poverty

© Sara Anjargolian via Asbarez.com

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[Web Wrap]: Hollywood’s First Celebrity Humanitarian that America Forgot.

January 11, 2011

Anyone remember Jackie Coogan?

By Vicken Babkenian via Asbarez.com

A story that made the rounds in Hollywood in the 1960’s told of how a little girl who had been a fan of the TV series “The Addams Family” was lunching with her mother in a studio cafe, when she spotted the actor who played Uncle Fester. The girl excitedly approached the beefy 50-year-old man and asked him for his autograph. With a broad smile, he signed, “Jackie Coogan.” Studying the signature with great dismay, the little girl cried out, “Who’s Jackie Coogan? I have never heard of him! I wanted you to sign ‘Uncle Fester’!”1

While many of us will identify with the girl’s disappointment, the story is fraught with irony and represents the forgotten legacy of Hollywood’s first “celebrity humanitarian.”

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Hollywood

Credit: Vicken Babkenian via Asbarez.com

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[Web Wrap]: People Came to Say Last Farewell to Ohan Duryan.

January 10, 2011

We express our deep condolences to the family and relatives of the great Armenian conductor.

Via Times.am

Many people gathered at the National Academic Theatre of Opera and Ballet to make a last farewell to Ohan Duryan, well-known composer and conductor.

Prominent art critics and politicians have attended the funeral ceremony to extend their condolences to the relatives of the deceased.

Please continue reading here.

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[Web Wrap]: Mount Ararat Climb Fulfills Lifelong Dream.

January 10, 2011

Aghabegians did what many people had dreamed yet so few accomplished. He scaled Mount Ararat this year with a team of other mountaineers, braving God’s fury along the way and the rigmarole it took to get there.
                – Tom Vartabedian
      
Thanks, Vahe for being an inspiration. 

By Tom Vartabedian via Asbarez.com

“All my life, I thought of Mount Ararat as sort of a mother figure with its kind, loving, and gentle presence. As you climb this mountain, it proves to be unkind and more challenging with each step upward. Ararat makes you feel insignificant yet majestic with each step you take to reach the summit.”

The voice belongs to Vahe Aghabegians, an Iranian-born manufacturer by trade who divides his time between Yerevan and Glendale, once having served as advisor to the foreign minister of Armenia.

Please continue reading here.

Ararat-summit-

Credit: Tom Vartabedian via Asbarez.com

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[Web Wrap]: The Art of Calligraphy: Script in its Purest Forms.

January 9, 2011

Calligraphy as discipline was a rare find in the rich legacy of Armenian culture.
– Ruben Malayan

By Ruben Malayan via Asbarez.com

Two years ago I had a request from the Editor of upcoming “Encyclopedia of World Calligraphy” to contribute to the edition by drawing samples of Armenian script. When I asked what exactly would this request imply I was told that they needed all four major scripts executed with sequence of strokes ( i.e. the direction of writing). For over three month I have spent nights drawing letters, digging out anything I could find on my bookshelf, only to discover that calligraphy as discipline was a rare find in the rich legacy of Armenian culture. How come, I said to myself, how could it be that we have so little written about it? We have studies of paleography (science of writing) but practically nothing on calligraphy (art of writing).

Please continue reading here.

Armenian Erkatagir Alphabet

Credit: Ruben Malayan via Asbarez.com

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[Web Wrap]: Urartian King’s Burial Chamber in Van Opened for First Time.

January 9, 2011

A new site to explore.

Via Asbarez.com

VAN, Turkey (Anatolian News Agency)–The burial chambers of Urartian King Argishti I and his family in the western wing of an ancient castle in the eastern Turkish province of Van have been opened for the first time.

“The burial chamber is in the western part of Van castle and bears the workmanship of the highest quality. It is reached through a 24-step staircase,” said Rafet Çavuşoğlu, a professor at Van Yüzüncü Yıl University’s Archaeology Department.

King Argishti I was buried in a rock burial chamber called “Horhor Cave,” said the professor, who specially opened the doors to the graves to Anatolia news agency.

Please continue reading here.

Tushpa Van Fortress

Credit: Asbarez.com

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[Web Wrap]: Ianyan Magazine’s Year in Review.

January 8, 2011

Highlights from Ianyan. Because we like it so much.

By Liana Aghajanian via Ianyan Magazine

As we descend into the final hours of 2010, here is a look back at what ianyan brought you this year, from a review on HBO’s Jack Kevorkian biopic, to the cultural stigma experienced by gay Armenians, volunteering in Armenia, reactions to an elevated child abuse case and more. A heartfelt thank you to all who shared, commented, linked and emailed, our greatest motivator is the audience we serve. We are excited to see what stories 2011 holds. Health and happiness to you and yours.

Please continue reading here.

Credit: Liana Aghajanian via Ianyan Magazine

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[Web Wrap]: The Roots of Christmas.

January 7, 2011

Was Christmas originally Pagan? Maybe not. Check it out.

Via The Eastern Diocese of the Armenian Church of America

A reliable feature of recent Christmas seasons is the chorus of voices in our newspapers, magazines, and television programs, “assuring” us that the roots of Christmas lie in pagan celebratory practices. But is that really the case?

In an article titled “How December 25 Became Christmas” (published in “Biblical Archaeology Review,” and available online here), a scholar of the early Christian movement questions this conventional wisdom of the secular world. Simultaneously, he offers an alternative explanation rooted in the authentic Christian spirituality of the 2nd through 4th centuries A.D. Armenian Christian readers will take a special interest in the writer’s knowledgeable references to the Armenian Church’s traditional date for our Lord’s nativity—January 6—which provides a vital piece of evidence for the case he makes.

Please continue reading here.

Pieter Bruegel’s 1566 Oil Painting of Bethlehem
At the Time of Christ’s Birth.

Credit: The Eastern Diocese of the Armenian Church of America