Archive for the ‘FAR New York’ Category

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[FAR New York]: Moving the Blog to a New Location…

January 12, 2011

Dear Friends,

Over the past year, at this location, the Fund for Armenian Relief has brought you the latest news about our work, as well as the happenings within the Armenian community through our blog. Today, we’re happy to announce that we’re new and improved – blogwise, that is. Now fully integrated into our website http://farusa.org, with better image quality, better browse capability, and stronger connection to the rest of the social media world, we’re definitely hoping to enhance your reading experience.

This is also another way to make it easier for you to stay in touch with our community, of course. Whether it’s a story about our child protection program, the latest scholarship recipient or a link to one of our favorite blogs, we hope that our new layout will make it easier and more enjoyable for you to stay informed on the latest and keep the conversation going.

Please do stay in touch and visit us at http://blog.farusa.org.

As always, we look forward to hearing from you.

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[FAR New York]: FAR Wishes You A Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year.

December 24, 2010

Dear Friend,
 
We hope you enjoy this holiday season. Despite its somewhat hectic nature, Christmas is indeed a special time to appreciate friends and family and the love surrounding the season.
 
As always, we at FAR are especially grateful for the support of our friends this time of year. You have given us the power to continue our programs, which give Armenians opportunity and support they need to build a stronger nation.
 
We see the next year as one filled with even more opportunity and we hope you will continue to stand with us and our mission to create a better Armenia.
 
Thank you for everything you have done for us this past year.
 
From all of us at FAR, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

P.S. FAR will take a brief hiatus from our posts and we will resume on January 10.

New-Year-tree

Credit: Felix Arustamyan

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[FAR New York]: FAR Wishes a Blessed Thanksgiving.

November 24, 2010

 

Autumn_by_Edgar

Credit: Edgar Marukyan via Photos from Armenia

Dear Friends,

We are in that brief period of time before the hectic holiday season is fully upon us. This is the moment when we can take a breath, appreciate all that surrounds us, and reflect upon everything life has given us over the past year.

As always, I’m grateful for so much, especially that this has been a year when FAR has helped more children and young adults to continue their educations. We’ve taken more steps toward bringing better healthcare to Armenians in areas where it’s most needed. We’ve been able to bring sustanence to the elderly and give children from low-income families the chance to play at summer camp. And we’ve been able to help support valuable scientific research.

There’s so much more to do and there are so many more ways to help Armenia. We at FAR will continue to do so with your support. Meanwhile, this Thanksgiving I ask you to join me and give thanks for your friends, family and all that is gratifying in your own lives, but also for all the good work that’s been made possible through your kind and generous support.

Thank you and Happy Thanksgiving.

Garnik Nanagoulian

P.S. FAR will take a brief hiatus from our posts and we will resume on Monday.

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[FAR New York]: Lectures in honor of Dr. Yervant Terzian.

September 13, 2010

The annual Terzian lecture series kick off in 2011 with Dr.John Mather from NASA GSFC. The dates are February16-18, 2011. Dr. Mather shared the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission, and is currently Senior Project Scientist on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

Dr. Mather will give a public lecture on Wednesday February 16, 2011, an Astronomy Colloquium on Thursday February 17, 2011 and, most likely, a less formal lunchtime talk on Friday February 18, 2011.

Terzian Lectures were endowed by a philanthropist Charles Mund, Jr. in 2009 to honor the world renowned Cornell University astrophysicist Dr. Yervant Terzian on the occasion of his 7oth birthday.

Prof. Terzian's Interview

Credit: FAR Staff

Professor Yervant Terzian is also the Chairman of the FAR’s Armenian National Science and Education Fund (ANSEF), that for more than 10 years has been supporting the leading scientists in Armenia by providing grants to continue cutting edge research (www.ansef.org )

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[FAR New York]: FAR Board Member Visits Gyumri Projects.

September 10, 2010

On September 7, FAR Board member Michael Haratunian with his wife Marie visited Gyumri. Mr. Haratunian, reviewed FAR projects currently under way in the city: GTech, Ounjian School and Gyumri Orphanage.
GTech Deputy Director Amalya Eghoyan shared with visiting guests the new developments in the Center, focusing on the establishment of the GTech business incubation unit.

Mr. and Mrs. Haratunians visited GTech

M. Haratounian

Credit:FAR Staff

Mr. and Mrs. Haratunian visited the construction site of the Ounjian School, where new premises are being erected thanks to generosity of the School benefactor, Dr. John Ounjian from the US.

Michael Haratunian in the Ounjian School’s
Construction Site
 

M. Haratounian 1

Credit: FAR Staff

The visit to the Gyumri Orphanage was very emotional. The Orphanage children (aged from 1 month to 6 years) had eyesight and spinal health problems.  Though, in the recent years the Armenian government has been making efforts to improve the conditions of those children, still there are numerous problems and needs to address. Ms. Ruzanna Avagyan, Orphanage Director talked to the guests about the challenges they are facing.

Mr. and Mrs. Haratunians
visited Gyumri
Orphanage

M. Haratounian 4

Credit: FAR Staff

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[FAR New York]: An Intern’s Farewell, Part 1.

August 11, 2010

By Samantha McQueen

Day 1: I sat in the office of the Communications Director to discuss my role with the organization. We talked about three potential projects that I could work on. I agreed to tackle all three. When asked if I could really handle them, I simply nodded but really just sat there thinking I thought I was just supposed to stuff envelopes or something. What did I get myself into?!

The three projects somehow evolved into what seemed like a million and I think I’m up to around 15 different tasks by now. I told my new boss exactly what I wanted to get out of this from the start. How many students in my position really have that opportunity? I wanted an overview of money flow and basic communication skills: I think I accomplished that in the first week.

I’ve now published to the blog more times than I can count, learned everything there is to know about non-profit policies, and even communicated with officials halfway around the world. Oh and I somehow managed to become a Facebook expert along the way. And we can’t forget about that trip to Armenia. That was completely unexpected and amazing.

The verb “intern” literally means to constrict or confine. I don’t think my role here has been anything close to that definition. I wasn’t even confined to the country! From literally building my own job description to simply writing original blogs, I’m creatively in charge of my work here.

Last day: I’m sitting in my desk chair, actually laughing about what I wrote for day 1. The skills I’ve gained take up and entire page of my resume. And we haven’t even begun to discuss the personal changes I’ve been through…

Samantha at the FAR office in Yerevan

Samantha at the FAR offices in Yerevan

Credit: FAR Young Professional

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[FAR New York]

August 4, 2010

With profound sorrow we received the news of Mrs. Helen Mardigian’s passing away.

True humanitarians, the Mardigian Family, and Mrs. Helen Mardigian personally, have contributed significantly to many virtuous causes. In 2008 they established The Mardigian Family Foundation together with FAR to support Child Protection Programs in Armenia.

On behalf of the Fund for Armenian Relief, we express our sympathy and offer our prayers to the Mardigian family.

A note from Archbishop Khajag Barsamian.

flags.jpg

Credit: Artur Petrosyan