Author Archive

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[Armenian Life]: Aram Khachaturian & The Rolling Stones.

July 22, 2010

By Celine Kaladjian

For years I’ve known that our personal interests have paths that will often never cross. Sometimes, however, they do. I admit it. I am and will always be a rock ’n’ roll fan. I am talking about real rock ’n’ roll here — not popish-californian pseudo punk rock. As Keith Richards put it, “Everyone talks about rock these days; the problem is they forget about the roll.”

Aram Khachaturian

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Credit: Unknown

To my greatest surprise, during my stay in Armenia last year, I discovered that I have a real enthusiasm for this type of music. Let me just say that the wonderful Beatles bar on Pushkin Street and the Irish Pub on Parapetsi Street in Yerevan became my nightly headquarters.

The Rolling Stone Mobile Studio

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Credit: Unknown

But what would you say if I told you The Rolling Stones and Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian have something in common? Believe it or not, they do. In 1968, The Rolling Stones, tired of not being able to record tracks whenever and wherever they wished, conceived their own Rolling Stone Mobile Studio. Led Zeppelin, Frank Zappa, The Who, among others, recorded albums in this high-tech facility.

The Rolling Stone Mobile Studio

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Credit: Unknown

Initially brought to Europe in 1971 for the Montreux Festival, eight years later this studio was transported to the USSR (now Latvia). The purpose of this trip was to record Khatchaturian’s ballet Gayaneh, performed by the Latvian ballet company Riga. And this was one year after Aram Khachaturian had passed away. This ballet became famous worldwide when it was used for the soundtrack to “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

So now if you hear this live record, think of The Rolling Stones. Or vice-versa.

The Rolling Stone Mobile Studio

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Credit: Unknown

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[Meet Our Staff – World Cup Edition]: And Now For Something Completely Different – Soccer X and a half.

July 13, 2010

By Celine Kaladjian

[ soccer ] |ˈsäkər| noun, a game in which you actually have to be able to run for at least 90 minutes straight (unlike ‘American Football’ where they stop ‘playing’ every 2 minutes) – Urban dictionary definition.

If I believe the scientific grounds of this definition, let me tell you that until 1985 (the year I was born), my dad – Robert Kaladjian – was indeed able to run for a long period of time. He started playing for A.F. Balustres in Marseille in 1977 and for many years, he dreamt of going professional.

I have always wondered why some cities are more prone to live through soccer. In Marseille, a whole identity is built around this sport. Actually, we venerate soccer teams as we would venerate a God. Until the late 90s, my dad belonged to the fervent supporter pack who would travel from city to city to cheer for his favorite team: l’Olympique de Marseille. For years, I have watched soccer games hoping to see him appear on the tube. Needless to say that those hours where fruitless.

But my dad has stopped being a real supporter. In his words “the 70s where the golden years, for soccer. Then came the 90s and the era of business soccer”. He remembers fondly the best World Cup he has ever watched: Mexico 1970.

Former supporters always keep an opinion about soccer. For this World Cup, he was hoping the U.S.A would go further. “At least they played with their hearts. So did teams such as North Korea or even Japan. I have the feeling that others are not aiming at the trophy anymore but more at trying to sell themselves after the World Cup”.

I grew up hearing legendary names such as Boli, Platini or Maradona. No wonder that my dad’s second favorite was Argentina. When prompted to give his reasons, he answered “Contrary to other coached, Maradona always said what he has to say. He has a big mouth and made me laugh”.

Genes must have something to do with one’s taste: I was hoping that Argentina would make it. At least I can rejoice to know that one specific person on the board has enjoyed seeing Germany beat them hollow!

Robert Kaladjian, 1977

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Credit: Kaladjian Family Archive

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[Armenian Landscapes]

June 11, 2010

Javakhk Scenery

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Armenian Landscapes]

June 6, 2010

The City of Goris

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Armenian Landscapes]

June 1, 2010

Davush Fields during Spring

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Armenian Landscapes]

May 26, 2010

Buildings in Kapan

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Web Wrap]: Air of Armenia – Top Souvenir!

May 24, 2010

Via Envoy Hostel Blog

You’ve travelled many wonderful places and come across many different ‘must have’ souvenirs. A NYC T-shirt, a mini Eiffel Tower, a toy koala perhaps? and the list goes on, each a treasure in their own right, a memory of a experiences you’ve had. But what’s the one souvenir that sticks in your mind? The one you cant wait to tell people about? The one you try to work into conversation with friends for a bit of a ‘show and tell’?

It could be a bullet pen from Bosnia, a Soviet relic from Russia or a piece of the Berlin wall (at least that’s what they said it was when I paid 10 Euro for the micro piece of concrete with some graffiti on it ok Im gullible).

But for one of our envoy guests, it was a souvenir she picked up from Armenia. She found the perfect souvenir in the can of “Air of Armenia” pictured below.

Please continue reading here.

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Credit: Envoy Hostel