Archive for October, 2010

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[CME]: Board Members Dr. Aram Chobanian and Dr. Edgar Housepian Honored by Yerevan State Medical University.

October 29, 2010

By Hambartsum Simonyan

FAR board members Doctor Aram Chobanian, President Emeritus of Boston University and Chairman of Yerevan State Medical University’s Board of International Advisors, and Doctor Edgar Housepian, Professor Emeritus of Columbia University and FAR founder, were recently given YSMU’s highest medals of honor.

Between October 6th and 10th, the medical school held a series of events, concluding a year of celebrations centered around its  90th Anniversary.

They included research symposiums, thematic conferences, workshops, social programs, the contemporary art exhibition “Optimizm”, as well as the presentation of certificates of acknowledgement and major awards. Dr. Chobanian and Dr. Housepian were honorable guests of the celebration, recognized for their great work with FAR’s Continuing Medical Education Program.

FAR has collaborated with YSMU on the CME program since it was founded in 2005.

Dr. Aram Chobanian Receiving
YSMU’s Highest Medal of Honor

Aram Chobanian_

Credit: Hambartsum Simonyan

Dr. Edgar Housepian Receiving
YSMU’s Highest Medal of Honor

Edgar Housepian

Credit: Hambartsum Simonyan

CME gives doctors from Armenia’s rural areas the opportunity to enhance their modern medical knowledge and practice.  These doctors have the opportunity to learn about innovative approaches and methodologies from top healthcare providers in Yerevan free of cost. CME also holds symposiums throughout the year.

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[Web Wrap]: Interview with Dr. Steven E. Wilson, Author of “The Ghosts of Anatolia”.

October 29, 2010

Dr. Steven E. Wilson will talk about his latest book The Ghosts of Anatolia: An Epic Journey to Forgiveness at the NYC’s Zohrab Center on November 11.

Via Zohrab Center

Award-winning author Dr. Steven E. Wilson recently published his latest adventure novel “The Ghosts of Anatolia: An Epic Journey to Forgiveness” a story about three families, two Turkish and one Armenian, at the start of World War I. After a trip to Jerusalem, Dr. Wilson, an ophthalmologist and scientist by profession, was inspired to write a historical novel about the Armenian Genocide. “The Ghosts of Anatolia” is his third publication. Taleen Babayan recently interviewed Dr. Wilson, who will present his newest book at the Zohrab Center on Thursday evening, November 11.

Taleen Babayan: What motivated you to write a novel with the Armenian Genocide serving as the backdrop?

Please continue reading here.

Ghosts-cover-for-blog-and-paper1

Credit: Zohrab Center

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[Armenian Landscapes]

October 28, 2010

Dilijan Forests In Autumn

Dilijan forests in Autumn_photo by Levon

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Web Wrap]: Art and Ethnicity – New Encounters Between Armenia and the Diaspora.

October 28, 2010

Art as a Bridge.

By Lilit Sargsyan via Hetq Online

When we talk about closing the cultural gap between Armenia and the diaspora we must keep in mind the different mentalities that divide Armenians in the RA and Armenians living in various foreign countries.

Often, RA Armenians perceive diaspora Armenians as tourists. Conversely, diaspora Armenians regard RA Armenians and the historic homeland in terms of a perceived vision, an archetype of inherited memories.  

Please continue reading here.

Nur

Credit: Hetq Online

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[Armenian Life]: CNN International on Musa Dagh.

October 28, 2010

Ninety-five Years After the Resistance of Musa Ler, A Celebration Continues. 

 Armenia Remembers Defense of Musa Dagh 

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[Web Wrap]: Armenian Archeologists: 5,900-Year-Old Skirt Found.

October 28, 2010

There’s more!

Via The Washington Post

YEREVAN, Armenia — An Armenian archaeologist says that scientists have discovered a skirt that could be 5,900-year-old.

Pavel Avetisian, the head of the Institute of Archeology and Ethnography in Yerevan, said a fragment of skirt made of reed was found during recent digging in the Areni-1 cave in southeastern Armenia. Avetisian told Tuesday’s news conference in the Armenian capital that the find could be one of the world’s oldest piece of reed clothing.   

Please continue reading here.

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[Hayastani Kidak Society]: An Intern’s Farewell, Part 2.

October 28, 2010

By Samantha McQueen

I almost feel bombarded (in a good way) with images and thoughts of Armenia. It is interesting that I’m noticing these reminders only after visiting the country. Now in America, I’m compelled to make everyone know that Armenia is the greatest country. Though clearly annoying to my friends, I can’t help but laugh at myself for becoming everything that I made fun of my mother for. I’m like that man from My Big Fat Greek Wedding who claimed that every single word found its roots in Greek.

I recently took a self defense class that just happened to be in the University Chapel. They have images of women from around the world, typically of low income, in the chapel basement. I caught myself smiling when I noticed that there was a picture of an Armenian woman laughing. She had no teeth and was standing in front of her tiny home, but she stood out among the portraits of somber women.

A Woman Making Lavash In Gyumri

A woman making lavash in Gyumri

Credit: Samantha McQueen

I pointed it out to my friends and they did their typical “yeah yeah we get it. You’re Armenian” spiel, but I still was proud that the Armenian woman was the only one that was clearly laughing of all the shots. I can just imagine her inviting the photographers in for a full meal with vegetables she had just picked from the garden and fresh lavash. It just made me miss the hospitality even more.
 
The only cure may be another visit.