Archive for August, 2010

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[Web Wrap]: Mosaic Presents: Arshile Gorky and Armenian Folk Ensembles at MOCA.

August 31, 2010

Museum of Contemporary Art of Los Angeles will host Arshile Gorky’s exhibition accompanied by Armenian folk musical interpretations.

The exhibition Arshile Gorky: A Retrospective is currently on view at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles through September 20. Hamazkayin’s Mosaic Concert Committee is organizing an evening of Armenian folk musical interpretations and original compositions by Armenian Public Radio and A Splinter, which will take place on September 9 in the courtyard of the MOCA from 5 to 8 pm.

The Museum is open late on this night from 5 to 8 pm and is free of charge. Everyone is encouraged to attend and walk through Gorky’s exhibit before closing on September 20. In the setting of the MOCA, visitors will enjoy Armenian Public Radio’s acoustic revival of Armenian folk melodies performed by Saro Koujakian, Ryan Demirjian and Mher Ajamian. While savoring a glass of wine, art and music lovers can reminisce with A Splinter as Ashot Tadevosian sings the humorous stories of our Armenian realities.  

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Arshile Gorly_Armenian Public Radio

Credit: Asbarez.com

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[Armenian Life]: Armenian Lavash.

August 31, 2010

Armenian Lullaby
Film about how to make Armenian Lavash

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[Web Wrap]: The Big Picture: Armenia Through Non-Armenian Eyes.

August 31, 2010

Inspiring photography series depict the life and times of Armenia.

By Liana Aghajanian via ianyan MAG

Boston.com’s the Big Picture is one of the most awe-inspiring and breathtaking  photo series on the web. So when the site recently publishing an amazing look at Russia in color, a century ago, by 19th century photographer Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii, we were tempted to do our own reoccurring photo show.

Below you will find various photography that captures the life and times of Armenia found through Flickr, all using a Creative Commons license. It is interesting to note, that only one of these photographs was taken by an Armenian photographer, making up a nice collection of shots of the country and giving Armenia a little more variety than a series of century old churches or mountains.

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A 106-year-old Armenian woman
sits in front of her home
guarding it with a rifle,
in the village of Degh,
near the border of Azerbaijan. 1990

Ianyan mag photo

Credit: Creative Commons
/United Nations Photo/by Armineh Johannes

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[CASP]: Siranush Summer Camp Comes to a Close.

August 31, 2010

The Siranush camp wrapped up its summer session on August 25. Now the 77 Children of Armenia Sponsorship Program beneficiaries who had spent a good part of their summer playing and learning in Yeghegnadzor have returned home with some unforgettable memories to cherish.

Camp3

Credit: FAR Staff

A bonfire and feast were held on the campers’ last day and the children participated in singing and dancing as well. All eagerly expressed their thankfulness to CASP and to FAR for making it possible to attend the camp and find an escape, however brief, from work and school during the year.

Camp1

Credit: FAR Staff

The Children of Armenia Sponsorship Program supports children from low-income families year round through monthly stipends to help them make ends meet. CASP also enables these kids to attend camps like Siranush each summer.

CAMP2

Credit: FAR Staff

All of us at FAR wish these children the very best!  

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[Armenian Life]

August 31, 2010

Rocky Pyramids of Goris

Rocky pyramids of Goris_photo by Levon

Credit: Levon Lachikyan

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[Dispatches from Armenia]: Tztesutjun Armenia.

August 30, 2010

By Erin Henk

This is really difficult. After two months in Armenia, my return to the U.S. looms. For the past week I’ve been trying more than ever to process this incredible experience with the hope of being able to summarize it in some kind of eloquent and profound way. This is not going to be the case, unfortunately.

I can try and explain it a little bit, though. Being here has been a constant learning process and I’m actually pretty happy to say that I’ve experienced a range of emotions over these two months, both high and low. At the risk of spewing clichés, I find it incredibly hard to describe how strongly I feel about Armenia and Armenians now. Before I came here my knowledge of Armenia added up to, well, nothing. I mean this in the best possible way. Since starting to work for FAR about a year ago, I’ve learned about the organization’s work, along with a little bit about Armenian history and culture and I’ve appreciated all of it. For an odar like me, however, this was nothing compared to actually experiencing Armenia, its wonderful people and witnessing FAR’s work firsthand.

Erin_dispatches_Armenia2

Credit: Erin Henk

Since coming here, I’ve been able to see things like the fragmented remains of the Nagorno-Karabagh War juxtaposed with development in Shushi and Stepanakert and watch clouds sweep in and cover Tatev monastery and its majestic surroundings. I’ve been lulled to sleep by the river in Goris and now feel quite at home in the bustle of Yerevan. I’ve been fortunate enough to meet face to face with the students, doctors, the elderly and the children whose lives have been touched in unique ways through FAR’s programs. And there’s more – tasting some of the freshest and most flavorful fruits and vegetables on earth, attempting to dance, learning the true meaning of Armenian hospitality and the Armenian love for culture and art, and forging friendships that I hope will have no end. I’ve even managed put aside my pre-conceived notions that I’d never be able to learn Armenian and I got myself a tutor. We’ll see how that goes. 

My strong feelings about Armenia and Armenians didn’t happen overnight, either. I arrived eager to absorb all I could about FAR’s work, along with some Armenian culture and history. My hope was for an enriching experience, which would enable me to improve my work. I never guessed this trip would spark such a fascination. Something crossed over in me, something that’s caused me to be enthralled by Armenia’s tumultuous history, the dynamism and strength of its people, and its global community more than I ever thought possible. I can hardly remember being so pleasantly surprised by something that’s captivated me so unexpectedly.

Erin_dispatches_Armenia

Credit: Erin Henk

There have been many goodbyes lately; people ask me when I’m coming back. Even though I don’t know when, I do know that I am. On that note, minch nor handipum, Hayastan. 

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[Armenian Life]

August 30, 2010

Yerevanian Kaleidoscope

Armenian Life_Yerevanian caleidoscope

Credit: Levon Lachikyan