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[FAR New York]: Moving the Blog to a New Location…

January 12, 2011

Dear Friends,

Over the past year, at this location, the Fund for Armenian Relief has brought you the latest news about our work, as well as the happenings within the Armenian community through our blog. Today, we’re happy to announce that we’re new and improved – blogwise, that is. Now fully integrated into our website http://farusa.org, with better image quality, better browse capability, and stronger connection to the rest of the social media world, we’re definitely hoping to enhance your reading experience.

This is also another way to make it easier for you to stay in touch with our community, of course. Whether it’s a story about our child protection program, the latest scholarship recipient or a link to one of our favorite blogs, we hope that our new layout will make it easier and more enjoyable for you to stay informed on the latest and keep the conversation going.

Please do stay in touch and visit us at http://blog.farusa.org.

As always, we look forward to hearing from you.

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[Web Wrap]: World’s Oldest Winery Found in Armenian Cave.

January 12, 2011

Let’s add this to the list!

Via Asbarez.com

WASHINGTON — The earliest known winery, approximately 6,000 years old according to researchers, has been uncovered in a cave in the mountains of Armenia.

A vat to press the grapes, fermentation jars and even a cup and drinking bowl dating to about 6,000 years ago were discovered in the cave complex by an international team of researchers.

While older evidence of wine drinking has been found, this is the earliest example of complete wine production, according to Gregory Areshian of the University of California, Los Angeles, co-director of the excavation.

The findings, announced Tuesday by the National Geographic Society, are published in the online edition of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Please continue reading here.

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[Armenian Life]

January 12, 2011

First Snow in Yerevan

First snow in Yerevan-by-Felix

Credit: Felix Arustamyan

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[CSFC]: New Hope for the Children’s Center.

January 12, 2011

Last month, a group of distinguished women from the Eastern Diocese gathered to brainstorm ways to support and advance the mission of the Fund for Armenian Relief’s Children’s Center—one of the leading entities serving the cause of child protection in the republic’s capital city of Yerevan.

Among other initiatives, the members of the committee—Mrs. Sirvart Hovnanian (honorary chair), Mrs. Nadya Garipian (co-chair), Mrs. Sylva Torosian (co-chair), Mrs. Nuart Arslan, Mrs. Yegsa Bestepe, Mrs. Ani Hamparsumian, Mrs. Magda Najarian, Mrs. Sossie Najarian, Mrs. Karen Nargizian, Mrs. Talar Sarafian, Mrs. Anita Temiz, and Mrs. Alice Yigitkurt—decided to raise money to help organize a Christmas celebration for young people at the Children’s Center.

The funds they raised were matched by FAR’s Board of Directors chair Mr. Randy Sapah-Gulian and used to purchase gifts and supplies for children at the center. Archbishop Khajag Barsamian, Diocesan Primate and President of the FAR Board of Directors, traveled to Armenia at the end of December to present the gifts to the children and to attend the celebration at the center in Yerevan.

DSC_0149

Credit: Felix Arustamyan

Archbishop Barsamian conveyed the warm wishes of the women’s committee of the Eastern Diocese, and distributed the gifts to the children. Young people showcased their talent in a special program featuring singing, dancing, and skit performances.  Also attending the celebration were members of the Children’s Center’s Circle of Friends—benefactors in Armenia who are also working to raise funds for the center.

DSC_0162

Credit: Felix Arustamyan

Since its founding in 2000, the FAR Children’s Center has improved, transformed—and occasionally saved—the lives of some 6,000 children, aged 3 to 18, who were deemed “at-risk” for a host of heartbreaking social pathologies. A professional staff of social workers, psychologists, and nurses address the specific issues of each child, and work with that child and his or her family. 

New

Credit: Felix Arustamyan

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[CME]: CME Brings in First Group for 2011.

January 12, 2011

By Hambartsum Simonyan

This week, FAR welcomed the first group of 2011 participants for its Continuing Medical Education (CME) Program. Nana Karapetyan, a pediatrician from Artashat; Lusik Manatsakanyan, a therapist from Armavir; Garunik Ghushchyan, a therapist from Noyemberyan; and Astghik Gharaqeshishyan, a laboratory physician from Vanadzor, began the program yesterday. They will spend about a month working with doctors in Yerevan to learn about the latest medical advances in their specializations.

This begins the sixth year of CME. More than 255 doctors from Armenia’s rural areas have enhanced their knowledge of modern medical practice through this program since 2005. CME provides the way for these doctors to learn about innovative approaches and methodologies from top healthcare providers in Yerevan free of cost.

Hambartsum Simonyan with
CME Program Participants

CME

Credit: Hambartsum Simonyan

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[Web Wrap]: The Half-Armenian Identity: But Your Name Is…

January 11, 2011

What defines the Armenian identity?

By Robert Fullam via ianyan MAG

I have encountered the phrase “but your name is,” countless times when I meet new Armenians and non-Armenians alike. Explaining to non-Armenians that my mom is the Armenian has never been too hard but it is the conversations with Armenians that always tend to get me. Most if not all half-Armenians with an Armenian mother have encountered this. You go to a church picnic or recognize an Armenian name in school, etc and introduce yourself. Everything is going fine and then you tell them your name. They get this look on their face, of slight confusion, like they’re trying to reconcile your claim to your identity with your obviously non-Armenian surname. Repeated experiences of this situation had slowly made me feel slightly ashamed when I told Armenians my name, every time I told somebody, it felt as if all the eyes in the room were looking at me, judging me, judging if I were authentically Armenian.

Please continue reading here.

St. Hripsime Church in Echmiadzin
completed in 618, is one of the
Oldest surviving churches in Armenia.

St. Hripsime

Credit: Rita Willaert/Creative Commons/via ianyan Mag

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[Armenian Life]

January 11, 2011

Enjoy.

Armenian Song Aida Sargsyan ‘ Lorke ‘